Thursday, December 5, 2013

Better Writing With a Harder Job?



By W.S. Gager
I started a new job on July 1 and must admit that it is kicking my butt energy-wise but is fulfilling and I love it. It doesn’t really have anything to do with writing so I get up at 5:30 in the morning and write for about an hour and then head to work.

I have been fortunate to be able to take large chunks of time off in the last ten years with only a part-time job. Did I write more? Was my writing better? The answer is a surprising no. What I have learned is that I need to be around people in order to write. It helps me make them better characters. People help to feed my imagination.

Maybe that is why some writers go to coffee shops and write. It gives them that feeling of being around people but not the time spent interacting with them. While my new job is demanding, my writing has never been better. I have two projects going simultaneously, which I’ve never done before. I may not be writing faster, but I’m writing on a schedule and happy with the way both projects are going. They are very different and challenging. One is a non-fiction project that is collaboration. Another thing I’ve never done before. The other is a new series of books that have been in me for several years, I just couldn’t get them to come out until now. 

Why do you care what works for me? You don’t. The key is to find out what works for you and get your butt in the chair on a regular basis. That is what the big time authors say when interviewed. They have a time for writing and do it every day. I’m living that. It is only an hour and in the pre-dawn but I can get a lot done. I’m also not allowed internet during that time which helps as well. Find out what works for you and then work your system. If you can take a minute from your writing, tell us about your system, so it might work for someone else. Gotta go, my hour is ticking!

W.S. Gager Bio

Award winning mystery author W.S. Gager has lived in Michigan for most of her life except when she was interviewing race car drivers or professional woman's golfers. She enjoyed the fast-paced life of a newspaper reporter until deciding to settle down and realized babies didn't adapt well to running down story details on deadline. Since then she honed her skills on other forms of writing before deciding to do what she always wanted with her life and that was to write mystery novels. Her main character is Mitch Malone who is an edgy crime-beat reporter always on the hunt for the next Pulitzer and won't let anyone stop him. Her third book, A CASE OF HOMETOWN BLUES, was a finalist in the 2012 Daphne Du Maurier Award for Excellence in Mystery/Suspense. A CASE OF VOLATILE DEEDS is the latest in the Mitch series.
 
This post sponsored by: A CASE OF VOLATILE DEEDS
Mitch finally scores a weekend dinner with a cute receptionist, but true to his reporter instincts an explosion in a high rise office building makes him stand up his date as he runs for an exclusive.  When he investigates, he learns his date is the only casualty in a botched robbery at a real estate office. When femme fatale Patrenka Petersen returns, Mitch learns that much of what he knows about his date and her work aren’t what they seem. His world continues to twist when the police captain asks for his help and a city hall informant is found floating in the river. Mitch must keep his head down or a cute dog with a knack for finding dead bodies will be sniffing out his corpse.  
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9 comments:

Patricia Kiyono said...

Great advice, Wendy. My father used to say, "If you want something done, ask the busiest person you know, because that person knows how to use his/her time effectively." I'm thankful to be retired, but I do find myself wasting more time than I did before. My best writing time is in the evening, after my husband goes to bed and the tv is turned off. The rest of the day seems to be dedicated to taking care of the endless marketing demands!

WS Gager said...

Glad you found a system that works for you. I used to be a night owl when I was younger...
Wendy

Peg Herring said...

I know we've discussed this, but my best writing time is early morning. After lunch I can edit, but I need a clear head to compose.
I honestly don't know how writers with another job get it done, but I know they have to, since nobody's getting rich from writing mysteries!

Tess Grant said...

I'm trying to write every day again, even if it's only a little. Hopefully it'll become a habit soon!

WS Gager said...

Thanks Peg! Maybe we could test it in Chicago...

WS Gager said...

It's not always easy. Hang in there! Miss seeing you!
Wendy

Joselyn Vaughn said...

Regular time indeed. I'm trying harder to treat it like a job, and put a certain number of hours a week toward it. Because of the holidays and such, it may take some time to get in a good groove, but I'm also keeping track of what I did each day. That's an easy way to see what days were spent productively.

WS Gager said...

The productivity list sounds like a great idea!
Wendy

J Q Rose said...

Finding the right schedule for writing is definitely a personal requirement. Every writer's life is so different. I've discovered I can concentrate best on writing my stories after lunch. You'd think it should be nap time, but no, that's creative time for me. Kudos to you for adding that extra hour into your day by getting up early to write!