Saturday, January 15, 2011

My Big Epiphany of the Week


by Tanya Eby

On my own blog this week I talked about losing my writing mojo. More specifically, my funny mojo. I feel like I’ve somehow become really, deeply boring because…well…I’m happy. And I wear mom jeans.

Surely I don’t have to be tormented to write, do I? Do I?

After talking this over with the therapist in my mind (I call him Bob. He’s much cheaper than a real therapist) I realized that I confused an interesting book with being an interesting person. I don’t need torment and conflict in my life, just my characters do. See, you don’t want to read a book where everyone is high-fiving and making necklaces and singing campfire songs. Even Amish love stories have conflict and I know this because I’ve narrated several. Sure, the conflict is sometimes about who makes the best Snickerdoodles, but it’s still conflict.

My big epiphany is that I’m still interesting, at least to my friends. I’m just going through a creative transition where I’m moving from being a struggling single mom caught in a life of torment to a published neurotic author whose life is pretty boring…but wonderful. I can do this. I can totally do this! And instead of living out a novel and fighting pirates and lovers and pirate lovers, I can just have my characters do that. I can wear my mom jeans and talk about daycare and a great bacon meatloaf I just made, and my characters can stand on the cliff of the end of the world, then jump off it, discover they have wings, and then make-out with someone really hot in happiness.

Actually, I don’t write that kind of book. The point is….I could.

Thank you, Bob. I appreciate your help. Now if you can just explain to me why I keep having dreams where I’m a country music singer I’d really appreciate it.

2 comments:

chocoaddict said...

Mom jeans are nice and comfy, and as far as I'm concerned, you never lost your funny mojo! Keep on writing.

Patty

Bronwyn Green said...

Wait...you can make bacon meatloaf? That is not the sign of a boring person.

You, my dear, are entitled to a lack of conflict - revel in it. Your characters, however, are not. Please continue to make them suffer.